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DIY

DIY: Pure + Natural Spring Mobile

March 22, 2016

Hi readers, this is Kerstin from Hannover, Germany and I’m really excited about being a member of Holly’s team on decor8 going forward. Once a month I will visit you here to share some lovely handcrafts that you can make yourself. Here is my first DIY inspiration for you, I worked on recently and it’s a nice welcome project to spring. I love to work with a variety of materials and create some simple, nature-inspired items for home decoration or for yourself in the form of simple jewelry. Today we’re going to make the elements shown below in my photo that we will then use to create a mobile. But first…

DIY: Pure + Natural Spring Mobile

Kerstin Reilemann for decor8

Sunday was the first day of spring, does it feel that way where you live yet? It’s still not feeling like spring yet so I decided to create a light and poetic mobile for you because it is a nice symbol for the season. As the days warm up and the sun is out longer, why not go out and see what you can find from a nearby park, garden, forest or your backyard to use for this project? Nature thrives on opposites, which are brought into harmony – it is the same with my mobile. I decided to use various materials, like finds from nature which include birch branches, stones and blossoms and I’ve combined with wooden beads and nature-inspired paper cuts – light and heavy, round and angular, rough and soft.

DIY: Pure + Natural Spring Mobile

Kerstin Reilemann for decor8

For showing you how easy you can create some of these elements, I made some photos to visually share my steps with you. Continue Reading…






DIY

DIY: Set of 3 Hanging Mirrors

March 15, 2016

Hello decor8 readers, it’s Agata here again and I can’t wait to share with you a new, interesting DIY idea to try! This time we will be dressing up mirrors. Are you ready? I’ve always loved decorating with mirrors, as apart from being stylish, they are very practical – they open up a room and reflect light, making each corner feel brighter and bigger. That’s probably the reason why I have at least one in each room. How many to you have at home? I particularly like the look of hanging mirrors in groups, in all possible shapes and versions. Whether they are modern or vintage, they add something a little more special than the standard framed ones so having one (or 3!) on your wall is a great way to show some character.

DIY: Set of 3 Hanging Mirrors

Agata Dimmich for decor8

Sometimes though, mirrors can be overpriced, so I always try to come up with alternative ways to ‘get the look’ without breaking the bank. If you are a little like me, a fan of budget-friendly DIYs with custom possibilities, I have a feeling you will like this one! Today I will show you how to make a set of 3 small, hanging mirrors with painted edges for a bit of non-traditional, unique look. They are very easy to make (no drilling or glass cutting),
and the total budget for this project is around $10 for all 3! Continue Reading…






DIY, Flowers

DIY: Wreaths With Eucalyptus and Ruscus-Leafed Bamboo

March 5, 2016

Hello dear decor8 readers! My name is Anastasia Benko and I am a stylist, artist and vintage shop owner based in Germany. Holly’s blog has always been a constant source of inspiration to me and I am honored to be part of the amazing team of decor8 now! In my monthly flower column for decor8 I will create seasonally appropriate floral arrangements that will hopefully inspire you to bring the outdoors into your home too!

DIY: Wreaths With Eucalyptus and Ruscus-Leafed Bamboo

Before I share my first arrangement with you, I’d like to tell you a little more about my philosophy. For my arrangements I love to use what my surroundings offer. For me, a house doesn’t feel like a home without flowers and plants! This is also the reason why you always find natural elements in my home, I never come home empty handed from my walks in the nearby forest. I love to challenge myself and try to stick to the changing seasons to reflect the nature of the season. Of course there are occasions where only a lush flower arrangement makes sense but I also think that branches can make a huge impression and almost look like beautifully arranged sculptures.

DIY: Wreaths With Eucalyptus and Ruscus-Leafed Bamboo

After several years of working with flowers and plants I realized that no matter what time of the year, I am always drawn to wreaths. Wreaths have the most perfect form for me, a circle that is connecting one end with another – it’s beautiful but yet complex. This time I wanted to make 2 super-sized wings out of eucalyptus that can be arranged in two different ways: an open half wreath and a more wreath-like, round installation. These are my mood boards I created for the stylings: Continue Reading…






DIY

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters

February 16, 2016

Hello! It’s Agata here with a design and travel inspired DIY story. But first, I am extremely excited to be a part of the all new decor8 team and to share my ideas with you guys in a monthly home-related column. In my projects, I’ll aim to create pretty details for your spaces following recent trends and styles, but no rocket science, I promise! All of my tutorials are very easy to follow, so you can try them at home with no stress. Having said that, it’s time to get creative and design some Moroccan coasters. Are you ready?

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters

Undeniably, there has been a lot of excitement surrounding Arabic fabrics in the last couple of years. And, when I say a lot, I really mean a lot. It seems like we are slightly obsessed draping every surface around our homes with the Beni Ouarain rugs, cushions, blankets, table runners, and everything else we can find with fluffy ends and zig zag lines. In fact, it appears the trend is still very hot as I saw Moroccan curtains the other day.

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters

In keeping with this Moroccan trend, I came up with a new accessory. It’s something I haven’t seen yet, a mini version of the rugs for our hot drinks or our plants. Before we get into the details I have a confession to make, I love pretty fabrics and all sorts of textiles. My cupboards are filled with many materials I bring back from my travels or find digging in the street market baskets, but when it comes to sewing, I’m not the girl for the job. Seriously. My skills allow me to sew a button to a jacket, but that’s about it. Any sewing jobs involving a sewing machine scares me, so I always look for alternative ways to bring my ideas to life. And, here it is, a very simple way to make no-sew fabric Moroccan coasters. Your drink will be dying to rest on these!

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters

You will need:
– Thin layer of cork
– Arabic style fabric in beige color
– Craft knife
– Scissors
– Fabric pens – black and blue
– Strong hardware double-sided tape

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters

Instructions:
1. First, you will need to decide how big you want your coasters to be – the standard size is 4 in x 4 in but since we are going for the look of the rug I thought 4 in (+1 in of fluff, 1/2 in on each side) x 3.5 in was perfect.
2. Draw the desired shape on thin layer of cork and cut it out, using a craft knife.

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters
3. Cut the right size fabric for each coaster, adding 1 in to the long side for the rug edge fluff and be sure to leave enough fabric to wrap it around the cork.
4. Cover both sides of the cork with the double-sided tape making sure to cover the entire surface.
NOTE: The hardware double tape is so strong that if you want to readjust the fabric at the later stage you might not be able to, so make sure to be as precise as you can from the beginning.

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters

5. Remove the protective layer from the tape and place the cork right in the middle of the fabric. Then wrap the fabric around it and press to the cork to the other side. At the end you should have cork tightly secured to the fabric.
6. Unravel a thread at the edges of your coaster, until you reach cork and tape. Then repeat it on the other side of the coaster.
7. Once you finish unraveling the edges of your mini rug coaster, stick double sided on top of the fabric ends to prevent from unraveling and give the bottom of the coaster a nice finish.

DIY: Moroccan-Inspired Fabric Coasters

8. Now comes the fun part! It’s time to make your own your pattern! Get the fabric pens and get creative. The good thing is, the lines on the original rugs are never perfectly straight so it can’t go wrong.

The best thing about this DIY is how easy they are to make. I do have an insane amount of coasters at home, suitable for different occasions, but I have to say, these are particularly eye catching.

What do you think of them? Are you also into the Moroccan trend? Have a great day and I’ll see you back here with another DIY story in March! – Agata.

(Photography, Styling and Text: Agata Dimmich. Editor: Jessy Senti)






DIY

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

March 3, 2015

Good afternoon everyone! My name is Victoria Hudgins and I’m here today as a guest to share a DIY that I made just for decor8 readers in celebration of my new book, Materially Crafted, which released today! I will show you in this post how to easily make some paper flowers that you can use as a tabletop display or on a wall, as props for a photoshoot, whatever you wish. Paper is such an awesome material to work with because you can form and transform it into just about anything. Nothing says spring like flowers and these paper flowers can be made no matter what the weather is outside. If you have any questions about this project, please ask in the comments section below. Let’s get started!

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

SUPPLIES To make each one of these flowers you will need:

  • 3 sheets of scrapbook paper
  • 14 gauge metal jewelry wire
  • Green wrapping tissue paper
  • Small wooden blocks
  • 1 cute button
  • A drill bit
  • Glue and scissors

HOW TO MAKE THE STEMS

  • Cover a length of wire with green tissue paper. Wrap and glue in place.
  • Make a leaf for the stem by winding the wire into a leaf form and covering with the tissue paper. Note: Leave about 2 inches of wire sticking out of the leaf to wind around the stem to hold into place.

HOW TO MAKE THE FLOWER HEADS

  • Cut two sheets of paper into about 3/4 inch strips. Using a paper cutter is easiest, but it can also be done by hand.
  • Using the third sheet of paper, cut out two 5 inch circles (one for the front and one for the back) of the flower. Also cut a small flower out of this paper to cover the front section of the flower (image 2 below top right).
  • Start with one of the circles lying flat and glue 1/2 the strips around the circle, then fold each upward and glue into place to make the petals.
  • Do this a second time on the inside of the first petals to make two rows. This adds dimension and texture.
  • Glue the small flower that you cut out onto the top to cover the glue dots and loose ends and glue a button for a fun spring style.
  • Put it all together.
  • Place the flower front side down and place the top of the stem centered in the back.
  • Cover the back with the second circle and glue well into place to hold the flower together.

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

DIY: Paper Flower Tabletop Display

FINALLY…

  • Drill a small hole into a wooden block and insert the bottom of the stem into the block to hold it upright.
  • Place flowers around a spring brunch table. Fill with honeycombs, cakes and sweets for a nice way to celebrate the season.

Learning how to work with different materials will enable your crafts to always come out beautifully! That’s why I wrote Materially Crafted: A DIY Primer for the Design Obsessed (check out the book trailer here if you’d like!). It’s more than a book of projects – it walks you through the how-to’s, tips, and tricks for working with so many of the most of common craft materials which can assist you in turning previous DIY fails into future raving successes! – Victoria

(text/images: victoria hudgins)






DIY

8 Easy Steps For Planning A Gallery Style Art Wall

November 6, 2014

I’m working together with Minted to present a series of posts on decor8 about planning and installing affordable, beautiful framed art at home with prints by artists far and wide. This is the first of three posts where I provide quick and easy advice on how I plan gallery style art wall because there is a rhyme and reason to it regardless of how many times you hear designers instructing you to just wing it. That may work, but only after your wall has a ton of nail holes and spackle marks.

8 Easy Steps For Planning A Gallery Style Art Wall

To be fair, yes designers CAN wing it. But that’s only after installing dozens of art walls for clients — after awhile you can eyeball stuff and intuitively know where it should hang.  But there are still some ground rules that are followed in the selection and arrangement whether the designer realizes it or not. Because that designer had to learn in the beginning and you can believe they learned art wall 101 – the importance of balance, telling a story through the work, hanging the focal point piece at eye level, etc. And they learned through a ton of trial, error and spackle paste.

HOW DO YOU PLAN AN ART WALL? 

I don’t know about you, but I rummage through what I currently own that hasn’t been hung yet, or in this case, I go and buy it all at once because I have a deadline and need to get my work studio finished by the end of November. No time to build my collection over time. And I see no problem with that. I’m buying prints, not fine art originals, so there doesn’t need to be a lot of thought behind each piece other than, Do I love it? Yes. Do the colors work? Yes. Does it work with what I’m already planning to use? Yes. Then it’s onto size, type of framing, with it be matted, etc. So when it comes to planning, the first step is to love the work and find the right spot for it in your home.

HOW DO I SELECT THE RIGHT WORK?

My first thought for this particular project was: what do I want this room to convey? Energy and joy. This is quickest to achieve through color and works that don’t take themselves too seriously. So no portraits of people, no black and white city views, nothing that makes you think too hard. I wanted a wall that you would look at quickly and simply feel energized and happy. Not much more. No story telling or deep emotional tales of love and war. I guess if you call my wall a person, she would be Cameron Diaz. Peppy, happy, fun, not too deep, a twinkle in her eye, feminine, free-spirited, energetic as all hell.

WHAT IS YOUR THEME OR MOOD?

Questions worth asking when choosing art for a salon style wall include: Do you plan to show favorite patterns and shapes, colors or a theme -like that you love to travel? Are you showing only family photos? Do you want to mix paintings with photography? Will you mix original works with prints and even three dimensional objects, like porcelain objects, old keys, rulers, etc.? For my wall, I’m going to mix in three dimensional objects after I install the wall, but for now I’m simply planning out the art and I’ll fill the spaces after everything is up. I like to work backwards sometimes. My theme is around patterns and shapes but beyond that, it was a mood I was going for: energy and joy.

WHAT ABOUT FRAMES?

As far as frame colors go, neutrals all tend to work well together – white, natural wood and black. When you introduce metallics, stained woods, colored frames, etc. things can start to become visually distracting. In most cases, you don’t want the frame to be the focal point, but the artwork inside. I believe the frame shouldn’t contrast with the art too much, unless you are working with a monochromatic scheme (black art, white frame). So if you have a dark plum-color painting then having it framed in natural wood or black is more complementary and warmer – a stark white frame would make the contrast too great in my opinion.

For my project, I wanted to mix and match the frames, mostly white since I thought they’d stand out nicely against the slightly gray walls in this space and I wanted some with wooden frames to complement the sideboard. Frame width is also important. Do you want it super slim, a few inches wide, or wider? Lots of country-style frames tend to be wood and very thick – almost like four barn floor planks made into a frame. Modern art galleries favor super slim frames for works-behind-glass. Like pencil width. It’s your choice and really about preference more than anything. If you like it, who cares if it’s not typical or common.

HOW ABOUT MATTING?

I like work that is framed and matted but I also am happy with just frames. For these works, I went with just frames. I like the look of work filling the entire area.  Mostly, when I do go with matting I go with pure white or linen. It depends on the print and the room, but either works very nicely. White shows off the work 100%, linen adds texture and warmth.

HOW DO YOU PLAN OUT AND INSTALL A GALLERY WALL?

If you lack patience like me, you can “wing it”. Planning complicates the process for me. The only real planning I do is that I measure the wall and then use Photoshop to mock up how I see the art (not 100% to scale but somewhat). I usually gather all of the work together in front of where I plan to install it and lay it out on the floor, playing with the arrangement until it looks right. In this case, I used my dining room tables since the art wall will go above the sideboard. If winging it isn’t your plan of attack, here are 8 steps so you can plan it like the pros.

8 Easy Steps For Planning A Gallery Style Art Wall

HOW TO PLAN A GALLERY ART WALL IN 8 STEPS:

 

1.  SIZE MATTERS: Measure the wall area where you plan to install the art

2.  HUNT & GATHER: Gather large pieces of solid paper in white or brown — so wrapping paper, butcher paper, any large pieces you can find, and tape them all together to form one very large sheet of paper. This will most likely be about the size of a bed when you are finished.

3.  GET LAID: Lay all of your art on the paper and move it around until it looks good. Until the arrangement speaks to you.(In my case, I laid all of my art out on the table directly in front of the wall where I plan to install it.)

4.  HOCUS FOCUS: Make sure the focal point of your salon grouping (the boldest piece) is hung at eye level either in the center of the arrangement or slightly off center- and then place all pieces around it from there.

5.  THAT’S TIGHT: For a tight grouping of art, try places them 3” apart. I don’t suggest planning your salon style wall in a symmetrical arrangement – it’s too hard to get right and a bit boring. I think the best spacing between frames is around 4-5” apart because then each piece can breath.

6.  TRACE ELEMENTS: After the art is laid out in an arrangement that you like, trace all of the frames with a black magic marker (quick drying).

7.  I’LL STICK YOU: The next step is to stick the massive sheet of paper* to the wall, in the exact position where the art will go. Tape it using painter’s tape so it doesn’t tear the wall when you remove it. Make sure the art heights and distances between pieces look right.

8.  WELL HUNG: Hang the art directly over the paper with nails and then carefully cut out or tear down the paper when all of the art is hung. You should be left with an art wall with work in all the right places. If not, then lather, rinse and repeat. It may take a little tweaking – my first gallery style art wall was a hot mess.

In my second post in this series, I’ll link you up to all of the works that I selected at Minted along with the frame styles and sizes. My final post of this series will be the big reveal, so stay tuned!

A big thanks to Minted for sponsoring my salon style art wall project.

* An alternative to a large sheet of paper is to use brown paper bags from the grocery store, cut them to be the same size as the art, and move them around on the wall until they look right.

(images: holly becker for decor8)






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