Browsing Category

uncategorized

uncategorized

Mariavera Chiari mv% Ceramics (Milan)

October 4, 2006

Mariavera Chiari mv% Ceramics (Milan)
If you’re considering a career change, you’re not the only one. Also looking to broaden her horizons to embark on a new and exciting adventure, Milan-based architect, Mariavera Chiari , recently turned her attention to ceramics.

Creating beautiful wares under her brand mv%, she designs both one-of-a-kind ceramics in organic shapes and textures to complete collections created in limited numbers. Her passion for experimentation is obvious from the moment you dive into her work online. Mirrors and ceramic table tops are certainly worth your notice, but I love her vessels for holding flowers, drinking, or enjoying gelato. A variety of textures, designs, colors, there is something to fit the taste of so many! All are objects built to perform double duty – function and certainly beauty, adding interest to your home.

You can locate Mariavera’s ceramics in your part of the world right here. And if you’re in Milan any time soon, her atelier is available to visit by appointment. That would be a day well spent. Simply email her at mvx100[at]libero[dot]it for more information or to schedule a visit.

Mariavera Chiari mv% Ceramics (Milan)

(images from mv%)

uncategorized

Lago Studios (Italy)

October 4, 2006

Lago Studios (Italy)
Italians never cease to amaze me – from their music, to fashion, wine, food, interior design… It’s all really quite impressive, isn’t it? I recently came across the Fluttua bed from Lago Studios, a suspended bed that is supported by a single foot beneath. No need for delicate balance or sleeping only in the middle, the foot is installed into the wall so the sleeping platform is secure. Gives the illusion that one is floating off to sleep, don’t you think?

Lago Studios (Italy)

The Fluttua, although certainly a beauty, may not be a bed I’d purchase though, most walls in apartments and homes I’ve lived in are 4″ of drywall, stuffed with insulation, hardly sturdy enough to support the weight of a bed without the entire wall falling down. Here in Germany, and I assume in Italy and most other Euro flats, I see this as no problem, most walls are extremely sturdy. In our building, the walls are a combination of concrete and stone.

Lago Studios (Italy)
Somewhat more practical for me are these 36E8 storage systems, offered in an array of colors, styles, and materials, so you are allowed to be as creative as you wish to conceal your clutter. I’m really crushing on the 36E8 collection, I like all of the options for installation, and the glossy cabinets are very attractive. I think the wood grain is my favorite, though.

Lago Studios (Italy)
Lago Studios (Italy)One last bit before I leave you alone with Lago, your new love. Here’s a photo of their studios in Italy, a nice space to create, don’t you think? I love peeking into the workspace of others. Link here to read Design Conversations (their blog), too. Simply click on the British flag to translate it into English.

Lago Studios (Italy)The Fluttua and 36E8 aren’t the only beauties from Lago Studios, don’t miss their broad range of practical, innovative, and very contemporary pieces, all so stunning, you’ll want to fill your home with lots of Lago love.

Enjoy!

Lago Studios (Italy)(images from lago studios)

uncategorized

coffee + cre8tive {oct 4 ’06}

October 4, 2006

Yesterday was one of the best days we’ve had here in Hannover because we spent some time window shopping and then, enjoying time with our family since it was a holiday here and things were quiet. Relaxing around the table, enjoying wine, telling stories, digging out old photos, chatting excitedly about current events from politics to religion and beyond. The conversation switched from German to English constantly, flowing like a wild river, a river I couldn’t quite tame despite how hard I tried.
coffee + cre8tive {oct 4 '06}Most of the time, I feel like I am starting over again, like a child in grade school, anxious to learn vocabulary and sentence structure. It can be frustrating, but a very positive experience because I continue to deepen bonds with my family and friends because I relay on them for so much help with the language. Needing something from others who genuinely want to share helps to solidify friendships by creating a sense of closeness. I can tell that people here really enjoy working with me on my German, and the young people especially love it when I speak English. The little ones show me their animal books and point to each animal, identifying them in German and then I point to the same animal teaching them the English word. Children love to teach adults, something I never really realized until I had to learn a new language. When I studied Spanish in school and Russian in college, I studied with peers and older ones. I never realized that some of the best foreign language instructors are children! Are you in the process of learning a new language, too?

coffee + cre8tive {oct 4 '06}
When with family here, I’m especially fond of my mother-in-law, who studied classical music and has such fine taste in music. Each time I visit her, I anticipate what she will introduce me to next. Yesterday, it was Eleni Karaindrou and Kim Kashkashian’s “Ulysses Gaze”, and two CD’s from Keith Jarrett, “Vienna Concert” and another with whom he collaborated with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette, “Standards of Norway”. I’m not familiar with these artists yet, but I enjoy expanding my tastes to include music that I wouldn’t usually gravitate towards if left to myself in a music store.

I always play music in the home, especially when reading or cooking, I think it enhances the environment, adding warmth, and depending on the music, either energy, peace, reflection, or a festive atmosphere.

coffee + cre8tive {oct 4 '06}
So, those are my thoughts for today. We’re heading to the hospital this afternoon to visit with my brother-in-law, although he is still in a coma, I’m certain he can hear us and is aware of his surroundings. Just the other day, I held his hand and as I started to caress it, his thumb began to move back and forth. This was very touching. I want to take a moment to thank all of you for writing in with such caring thoughts, I share your emails with my husband who is encouraged to know that so many are praying for his brother right now. I haven’t had time to respond to your emails, I’ve very sorry for this, but please know that I really appreciate your concern. :)

I’ll be back in a moment with some goodies for the day before I head out. Back soon!

coffee + cre8tive {oct 4 '06}
(images – love these window decals and the lamp and moose candles, too. Here’s a photo of some random textile installed around a pole outside of a textile shop here.)

uncategorized

Seattle Design Schools?

October 3, 2006

Can anyone help decor8 reader Helen from Seattle, Washington?

She writes, “Hi Holly, I am a marketing professional looking to go back to school and change my career path. I live in Seattle and I’m looking into evening interior design programs. So far I have talked to Seattle Art Institute and I will be talking to International Academy of Design. Since you are in the field, I would like to get your opinion and perspective on the above schools. Do they have a good reputation? Will companies hire based on the above name recognition or lack there of? Anything you could provide or suggest would be greatly appreciated. Since I do work full time, I am somewhat limited to just evening programs in the Seattle area.”

Sorry Helen, I’m not too savvy when it comes to design schools on the west coast, can anyone provide Helen with some direction?

Thanks Helen for writing in!

uncategorized

Cohda Speaks Up!

October 2, 2006

Cohda Speaks Up!I recently wrote about the Roughly Drawn Chair, a new design by Cohda in the UK. I was fond of the design, and like anything else I find appealing, I felt the need to share it with decor8 readers to get your thoughts on it.

Whenever I post, comments range from “this is great” to “it’s not really my taste”, both of which I respect and have deep appreciation for – your comments impact me, the designers, and each and every one of our readers. The differences of opinion that we freely exchange here on decor8 is what makes the blog more interesting. I encourage more of you to openly share your views on the designs I post. One of the best things about blogs is that we aren’t static websites, rather interactive ones that have a genuine pulse. It’s fun to learn from one another and to gain a new perspective. It’s very helpful to designers to learn about what others have to say about their work, the mini reviews that you leave via your comments is of great benefit to them. Designers appreciate it when you leave constructive criticism. On the flipside, detailing why you appreciate the design is also helpful.

Unfortunately, you’ll always find a few readers that, for whatever reason, post comments that, whether knowingly or not, challenge the integrity of a design, which can lead to other readers forming suspicions about the product themselves. I think it is unfair to speak against anyone if they are not in the room to defend themselves, so to speak. After I posted about the Roughly Drawn Chair and a few anonymous comments sprung up calling the design “pathetic” and “a bad copy”, I felt the need to give Cohda a heads-up. I was hoping they’d want to get involved in the conversation, and I’m so happy that they’ve replied. Here’s what they had to say:

From Cohda to decor8 readers –

It’s wonderful that there has been such debate surrounding our recycled designs. As some of the comments have raised concerns as to the innovation and possible copycat inspiration, we thought we would try and answer a few of these issues. We thought it also appropriate to forward more detailed shots of the work to limit confusion. We have added an image of our new Blood Seat launching later in the year and would welcome any additional comments.

Blood Seat

Cohda Speaks Up!Our work has evolved through a long period of research into the growing problems surrounding domestic plastic packaging waste in the UK. This is a huge problem with hundreds of thousands of tones of plastics waste being land filled annually. With very little public understanding as to the problem and the most notable recycled designs produced in the 1990’s we felt there needed to be a re awakening. The majority of recycled plastic designs have been limited to flat pack construction so we set about creating a process that would engage the public once again whilst braking from the traditional forms associated with recycled design. One of our key designers has undertaken two years of research at the Royal College of Art in London developing the new processes and bespoke tooling methods required for the work.

This in-depth research has let to the U.R.E process, which we use to re-form
waste plastics (bottle packaging and milk crates) direct into useable designs and unique forms. No virgin materials are used to create any part of our designs and therefore have a 100% recycled makeup. This also means that they can be recycled once more at a future date. We are also in the process of devising live exhibits to being scheduled for 2007 where the public will be part of the process, able to bring along their plastic waste and have transformed back into a design instantly. Thus eliminating large sections of the recycling process, saving vast energy and resource. Not innovative? You be the judge.

Additionally with reference to the comparative designs, as you may or may not be aware the wonderful Marcel wanders chair is produced in carbon fiber strands and the Campana brothers Vermelha was made from cotton rope and steel, so we find it a little odd that our designs have been compared so easily as bad copies or other designs despite not using any processes or materials even remotely similar.

We agree that there are blatant inspired designs out there on the market that offer a nod to the work of more influential designs and designers, but this series of work if far from that.

We worked exceptionally hard to develop unique process and designs, putting
vast resources into the project. With the designs now receiving strong admiration for their environmental objectives and innovative use of waste materials we fell we have fulfilled our initial aims for the work.

We are flattered that the design has be compared in such a way, but making decisions on the pieces being copies with very little knowledge of there context, background and makeup is a little strange.

Thank you for taking the time to comment on the work and on Cohda, we welcome all
feedback.

(images from cohda)

uncategorized

Marlies Pekarek + Tropfnass Collection (Switzerland)

October 2, 2006

Marlies Pekarek + Tropfnass Collection (Switzerland)
I recently came across the work of artist and object designer Marlies Pekarek of Switzerland. If you have a moment, view her online gallery and Tropfnass, her collection of unusual everyday objects. I found her soap figures to be most interesting, transforming something so mundane into an art form. I like how they look on a plexiglass shelf, don’t you? Her ghost curtains , sheer and ethereal in appearance, are equally intriguing. Some of her art, especially her series of diary drawings, could be a form of art therapy, much like what Niki de Saint Phalle became known for in her early years. Take a look at it and let me know what you think… Marlies’ has some captivating watercolor drawings in muted pastels that have a restful quality about them, reflecting a poetic imagination. At least in my opinion.

“Marlies Pekarek turns the mundane of the everyday object into pieces of sensitive art which put the mechanisms of valuation into question, behind uniformity lies individuality. The polarity of value and trash, art and mass production, meet and cross over.”

Your thoughts on this work?

Marlies Pekarek + Tropfnass Collection (Switzerland)

(images from marlies pekarek)

Top